How To Deal with a Narcissist in Divorce?

Narcissist is an often used, and generally overused, word in the divorce process. Nearly everyone has some narcissistic features, however very few people fit the medical/mental health definition of a narcissist.

A narcissist is defined as: a person who has an excessive interest in or admiration of themselves. People refer to narcissists as those who think the world revolves around them. The clinical definition of Narcissistic personality disorder — one of several types of personality disorders — is a mental condition in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance, a deep need for excessive attention and admiration, troubled relationships, and a lack of empathy for others.

This leads to the common question, “What is the difference between a contested and uncontested divorce?” That answer is simple, one the parties agree and the other they do not and must have a judge decide some or all of their disputed issues.

The underlying question is much more complex: Why do some people agree on terms and others fight?

There are many ways to deal with a person with excessive narcissistic personality features. It is important to share with your attorney if you believe that your spouse (ex-spouse) has these features and to develop a game plan in how to deal with them.

Using an attorney with extensive experience in dealing with a variety of litigants, especially narcissists, is helpful in not only handling the case, but also attempting to settle, deciding when to go to trial, and dealing with that person in the future. If you have children, the divorce is not the end of having to deal with the other parent.

If you have concerns and wish to discuss, contact Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) or email mike@bouldinlawfirm.com to schedule an appointment.

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What is a Kiddie / <21 DUI?

A Kiddie DUI, or DUI for a person under the age of 21 years, can be charged if the driver is under the age of 21 and has a blood alcohol level over .02. The legal limit for a person over the age of 21 is .08.

A person can be convicted of DUI, or driving under the influence, based on a number of factors. Typically, a DUI is for driving while under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. A conviction can be obtained if the defendant is driving a motor vehicle and under the influence or impaired by drugs or alcohol, or combination. Even if impairment is not noted, a person can be convicted if they are operating a vehicle with a blood alcohol over .08.

Regardless of age, generally if the driver has a blood or breath alcohol level over .08, they will be charged with thee standard adult DUI. Similarly, if the BAC level is over .15, the defendant will most likely be charged with an aggravated DUI, regardless of age.

A finding or plea to an Under 21, or Kiddie, DUI, has different consequences than a regular DUI. First, the fines are only up to $200 and there is no DUI service fee; as such the total cost is about $300 instead of $750. Additionally, an <21 DUI is not enhanceable, should the person later be charged with a 2nd DUI. Finally, there is a “zero tolerance” class that the < 21 defendant must take that differs from the minimum 20 hour DUI class.

If you have been charged with a DUI, whether regular, aggravated, high tier, or < 21, you should hire with an attorney. For consultation in Cincinnati or N.Ky., call Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 or email mike@bouldinlawfirm.com.

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Possession of Handgun & Drugs

Kentucky law allows for enhancement of any drug possession if the defendant also possesses a firearm. KRS 218A.992 provides:

Enhancement of penalty when in possession of a firearm at the time of commission of offense. (1) Other provisions of law notwithstanding, any person who is convicted of any violation of this chapter who, at the time of the commission of the offense and in furtherance of the offense, was in possession of a firearm, shall: (a) Be penalized one (1) class more severely than provided in the penalty provision pertaining to that offense if it is a felony; or (b) Be penalized as a Class D felon if the offense would otherwise be a misdemeanor. (2) The provisions of this section shall not apply to a violation of KRS 218A.210, 218A.1450, 218A.1451, or 218A.1452. 

The non-applicable provisions are as follows:
218A.210 – Schedule V Controlled Substances

218A.1450, .1451, .1452 – Trafficking, possession or cultivation of Savia

Interestingly, marijuana is NOT exempt from this enhancement. Despite possession of marijuana being a class B misdemeanor, the defendant who possession marijuana and a firearm is subject to begin penalized as a Class D Felon under 218A.992(1)(b). A class D felony carries 1-5 years in prison.

It is important to know your rights as well as possible consequences. While marijuana is illegal, the penalties may become much greater if you possess a firearm. If you are charged, contact Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) or email mike@bouldinlawfirm.com.

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Not All Custody Is Equal

Equal Parenting Time In Kentucky

Presumption

In previous article I spoke of the Kentucky law that presumes shared custody and equal parenting time in Kentucky.   This law, KRS 403.270, remains perfectly valid and in effect, however recent case law underscores the importance of representation and knowing your rights.

New Kentucky Case Law

Barnett v. White

See above link for full case content.  Barnett v. White is the first case interpreting how 403.270 should be applied.  It states, “While the new version of KRS 403.270(2) puts a finger on the scale in favor of joint custody and equal time sharing by requiring only a preponderance of evidence to overcome, such a preference is a slight burden and the trial court continues to possess broad discretion in determining the best interest of the child as to who should have custody and where the child shall live.

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