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February 2014 Archives

Kenton County DUI

I am often asked if I accept clients in Kenton, Campbell or Boone County. Yes. Even though Lawyers are licensed to practice throughout the state and can practice any kind of law, does not mean that they should. Most lawyers specialize in one or two areas of law. Additionally, most limit their Geographic range. This allows the attorney to understand their stated field and to get to know the judges and prosecutors in those counties. I believe that it is easy to practice two areas in up to 5-6 counties. This is still fewer judges and prosecutors in 3 counties combined than many major cities. If you have been arrested for DUI in Kenton, Campbell or Boone call Mike Bouldin at 859-581-6453 or email at mwbouldin2@gmail.com.

What is Penalty for Heroin?

In Northern Kentucky, heroin is considered a schedule I narcotic, and possession is a Class D Felony. Class D felonies are generally punishable by 1-5 years in prison, however the newer regulations make this particular crime, PCS, punishable by 1-3 years in prison. In addition to the possible prison sentence, the courts are mandated to first explore other options, such as pretrial diversion, deferred prosecution, or probation.  Depending on criminal history of the defendant and any prior felony convictions or diversion cases, the defendant may have many options for counsel to explore. Possession of Controlled Substance is found in KRS 218A.1415 and takes into account all schedule I and schedule II substances. Regardless, if you are charged with PCS, whether heroin or any other controlled substance, you need to retain a criminal defense attorney. In Boone, Kenton or Campbell County, email Michael Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453. (581-MIKE)

Will a Vacation Save My Marriage?

Each couple has their own set of difficulties in their marriage. In my finding as a divorce attorney, lack of intimate time together and constant interruptions of life can be escaped by a vacation, however the pattern often repeats after return from the holiday. My wife and I try to take vacations every year in addition to weekend getaways.  I think it helps to rejuvenate the love as well as recharge your entire self.  People who have more serious marital problems do not always get the same benefits from vacations. Many divorce clients take extended vacations prior to filing or seeing an attorney regarding divorce.  Many use a vacation as a last ditch effort to save the marriage.  Despite my career as a divorce lawyer, I am an advocate of marriage and believe that couples should work to save a good marriage. If you have a good marriage, work to reestablish the trust and intimacy.  If you do not have a good marriage, speak with a divorce attorney about your options.  In Northern Kentucky, call Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) or email at mwbouldin2@gmail.com.

What is Fentanyl?

Fentanyl is a powerful drug which is used primarily to treat chronic pain. It is considered a Schedule II Narcotic. In Kentucky, drugs are classified and scheduled based on their addictive nature. A person is more likely to become addicted to a schedule I drug than a schedule II drug. It is illegal to possess Fentanyl in Kentucky without a prescription and illegal to sell except by a pharmacist with a valid prescription.  Such users/sellers will be charged with Possession of Controlled Substance or Trafficking of Controlled Substance. Intravenous fentanyl is extensively used for anesthesia and analgesia, most often in operating roomsintensive-care units and in the prehospital medical setting.  Fentanyl transdermal patch  (Durogesic/Duragesic/Matrifen) is used in chronic pain management by slowly releasing the drug over a 48 hour period.   Fentanyl has recently been seen in NKy news as substitute for Heroin.  The widespread illegal use has yet to be determined or studied. If you are addicted or have a problem with drug abuse, visit Free Rehab Website.  If you have been charged with a crime, contact Michael Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453.

Valentine's Day Divorce

Valentines Day can be the a lonely time for recently separated or divorced individuals. It can also be a good time to reflect on your current situation and whether it is right or wrong for you.  If you are in a relationship where you are giving and not receiving, if you are unhappy with your current spouse, if you are in an abusive relationship or you are simply unhappy with your plot in life, you are likely already considering divorce. If you are considering divorce, it is important to know your options.  Many potential clients will schedule a consultation in order to discuss various aspects of divorce.  Common questions include: (1) how much does divorce cost?; (2) how long does divorce take?; (3) are there set amounts for child support or spousal support?; (4) how do we determine custody?; (5) how do we separate assets?; and (6) how do I protect myself? All of these are important questions and it is comforting to know the answers before you begin the divorce process.  Many times a client will schedule a one hour consultation, pay for services, and then make the determination of whether to proceed with divorce or stay in the relationship.  Another question often discussed is "How to divorce amicably and without significant costs?"  Numerous options may be presented, including collaborative and uncontested dissolution. If you would like to schedule a consultation regarding divorce/dissolution in Northern Kentucky or Cincinnati, call Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 or email at mwbouldin2@gmail.com. 

What Is Trafficking in School Zone?

Kentucky law enhances the penalties for trafficking of controlled substance or marijuana if the crime is committed in a school zone.  A school zone is defined as 1000 feet from any school building.  The distance is measured from the wall of the building in a straight line to the location of the sale. KRS 218A defines this this addition to trafficking offenses. KRS 218A.1411 - Trafficking in controlled substance in or near school -- Exception for misdemeanor salvia offenses -- Penalty. (1) Any person who unlawfully traffics in a controlled substance classified in Schedules I, II, III, IV or V, or a controlled substance analogue in any building used primarily for classroom instruction in a school or on any premises located within one thousand (1,000) feet of any school building used primarily for classroom instruction shall be guilty of a Class D felony, unless a more severe penalty is set forth in this chapter, in which case the higher penalty shall apply. The measurement shall be taken in a straight line from the nearest wall of the school to the place of violation. (2) The provisions of subsection (1) of this section shall not apply to any misdemeanor offense relating to salvia. Normally, trafficking of marijuana is a Class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to 12 months in jail and/or a $500 fine.  If a defendant is charged with trafficking marijuana within a school zone (school area), this becomes a Class D felony, punishable by 1-5 years in prison.  Trafficking of controlled substances, generally Class C felonies (5-10 years), are enhanced to Class B felonies (10-20 years). If you have been charged with ANY trafficking offense in Northern Kentucky, it is a serious charge and you need legal counsel.  For a consultation for Boone, Campbell, Kenton and Grant counties, emai Michael Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453.

What Is Penalty for CCW?

The penalty for CCW depends on the charge.  CCW is shorthand for Carrying a Concealed Weapon and is typically a Class A misdemeanor in Kentucky.  If the defendant has a prior felony conviction, the charge will be enhanced to a Class D felony.  Class A misdemeanors are punishable by up to 12 months in jail, $500 fine or both.  Class D felonies carry 1-5 years in prison.  Note: CCW charges also typically involve forfeiture of the weapon. The elements for CCW in Kentucky are spelled out in KRS 527.020 - Carrying concealed deadly weapon. (1) A person is guilty of carrying a concealed weapon when he or she carries concealed a firearm or other deadly weapon on or about his or her person. Also, if the person is a convicted felony they can be charged separately with the offense of Possession of Handgun by Felon, a Class C felony.  Felons are not permitted to own, possess or carry a handgun within the Commonwealth of Kentucky. If you have been charged with CCW or any other crime in Northern Kentucky, contact the office of Bouldin Law Firm and schedule a consultation with Micahel Bouldin.  Email at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453.

What is CCW?

CCW is shorthand for Carrying a Concealed Weapon.  This is generally a misdemeanor in Kentucky, charged as a Class A misdemeanor.  Class A misdemeanors are punishable by up to 12 months in jail, $500 fine or both.  Also, CCW typically carries forfeiture of the weapon.  If the person has a previous felony conviction, the charge is enhanced to a felony. The elements for CCW in Kentucky are spelled out in KRS 527.020 - Carrying concealed deadly weapon. (1) A person is guilty of carrying a concealed weapon when he or she carries concealed a firearm or other deadly weapon on or about his or her person. There are numerous exceptions to this rule, in addition to the permit that a person can apply for and take a class to obtain a CCW permit.  Once a permit is granted, there can be no prosecution for CCW unless in violation of other rules or regulations. Also note that CCW must be a CONCEALED firearm.  It is perfectly permissible to walk down the street with a loaded firearm that is plainly visible. If you have been charged with CCW or any other crime in Northern Kentucky, contact the office of Bouldin Law Firm and schedule a consultation with Micahel Bouldin.  Email at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453.

What Is Mediation?

Mediation is an opportunity for the parties to reach a mutually acceptable agreement without involvement by the Courts. Many family courts will mandate that the parties attempt mediation prior to having an hearing to resolve differences.  Mediation can be used in the collaborative process, or to resolve disputes in traditional divorce or dissolution cases.  Mediation is not binding unless both parties sign off on an agreement, however most attorneys do require their clients to abide by the terms agreed to in mediation.  It differs from arbitration in that no judge or arbitrator will make a decision. According to Wikipedia: Mediation, as used in law, is a form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR), a way of resolving disputes between two or more parties with concrete effects. Typically, a third party, the mediator, assists the parties to negotiate a settlement. Disputants may mediate disputes in a variety of domains, such as commercial, legal, diplomatic, workplace, community and family matters. The term "mediation" broadly refers to any instance in which a third party helps others reach agreement. More specifically, mediation has a structure, timetable and dynamics that "ordinary" negotiation lacks. The process is private and confidential, possibly enforced by law. Participation is typically voluntary. The mediator acts as a neutral third party and facilitates rather than directs the process. Mediators use various techniques to open, or improve, dialogue and empathy between disputants, aiming to help the parties reach an agreement. Much depends on the mediator's skill and training. As the practice gained popularity, training programs, certifications and licensing followed, producing trained, professional mediators committed to the discipline. If you are involved in a divorce, dissolution mediation is often the best chance to resolve your case.   If you need to discuss your divorce or mediation, call Michael Bouldin for a consultation in Northern Kentucky at 859-581-6453 or email at mwbouldin2@gmail.com.  

What Is Felony Theft?

In Kentucky, any theft over $500 is considered as a felony offense.  There are instances where a lesser amount may also be considered a felony, for example if you use a forged name, use a weapon to steal money or break into a home to commit the theft. If you are charged with felony theft, often TBUT > $500, then you are generally charged with a Class D felony.  If the amount in question is over $10,000, you may be charged with a more serious Class C felony.  Class D felonies are punishable by 1-5 years in prison, in addition to substantial fines and restitution.  If you are charged with theft, or any other felony offense, IT IS A SERIOUS CRIME! Felony theft is outlined in KRS 514.010, et al. Relevant statutes and links follow:  KRS 514.0.030 Theft by unlawful taking or disposition -- Penalties., KRS 514.040 Theft by deception; KRS 514.050 Theft of property lost, mislaid, or delivered by mistake; KRS 514.060 Theft of services.; KRS 514.065 Possession, use, or transfer of device for theft of telecommunications services; KRS 514.070 Theft by failure to make required disposition of property; KRS 514.080 Theft by extortion; and KRS 514.090 Theft of labor already rendered. If you are charged with theft or any other crime, it is advisable to retain a criminal defense attorney to represent you in court.  In Boone, Campbell, Kenton or Hamilton Counties, contact Michael Bouldin for a consultation.  Michael Bouldin has represented criminal clients throughout Kentucky and Ohio for nearly 20 years and can help you with your case.  Call MIKE at 581-MIKE, 859-581-6453.

What is Contempt?

Contempt is defined by Webster as: (1) a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval; (2) a lack of respect for or fear of something that is usually respected or feared; or (3) law : speech or behavior that does not show proper respect to a court or judge.  In domestic relations or family law, contempt is usually referred to as a violation of a court order. For the court to find a party in contempt, the court must make a finding that the person willfully violated a court order. Once the Court makes the finding that the party violated the court order, the person is deemed to be "IN CONTEMPT."  The Court retains certain rights to issue sanctions for the violation.  These sanctions vary in nature and are often based on the severity of the violation.  Courts may also increase penalties if violations continue.  In Kentucky, a Judge can sentence a party up to 180 days in jail and up to $500 fine for contempt.  This is the power for each separate violation.  In addition to these sanctions, the court may also order payment of all reasonable legal fees to the prevailing party. Many courts will issue what is known as purge remedies.  These PURGE is what the person can do in order to avoid the punishment which the court has issued.  For example, if a party is in contempt for failing to pay child support as ordered, the court may sentence the party to 10 days in jail, which may be purged by paying a set amount of money. If the money is paid, the party does not have to serve the jail time. If your ex spouse or other parent of the child is not abiding by the terms of Court Orders, you can file a Motion for Contempt with the Family Court.  If you have been charged with Contempt or you wish to file Motion, you should hire an experienced attorney to defend your actions and represent you in court.  An attorney who practices both family law and criminal law is a plus.  In Northern Kentucky, contact Michael Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453.

What Is A Divorce Retainer Fee?

What is a Retainer Fee?

A "retainer" is an advanced fee usually based on the lawyer's hourly rate. Think of a retainer as a "down payment" against which future fees and costs are billed. Usually the retainer is placed in a special account and costs are deducted from there. Bear in mind that a retainer fee usually is non-refundable. A retainer fee can also mean that you pay a retainer to have a lawyer on-call to handle your legal problems over a period of time.

What Is a Retainer?

What is a Retainer Fee?

A "retainer" is an advanced fee usually based on the lawyer's hourly rate. Think of a retainer as a "down payment" against which future fees and costs are billed. Usually the retainer is placed in a special account and costs are deducted from there. Bear in mind that a retainer fee usually is non-refundable. A retainer fee can also mean that you pay a retainer to have a lawyer on-call to handle your legal problems over a period of time.

What Is DUI.com?

DUI.com as well as dui1.com, exclusiveattorneys.com, gotdui.com and a variety of other websites are websites purportedly to assist individuals with finding an attorney to represent them with DUI defense.  Some of these sites are run by attorneys, others with no legal affiliation.  None of these websites are run by Kentucky attorneys.  Those attorneys who are listed pay a fee to be listed as an attorney.  The only qualification is that they pay the fee - nothing else.  The websites generally do have the attorney certify that they are licensed to practice in that particular state.   In addition to no affiliation with Kentucky, these websites are not governed by the rules of advertising as actual lawyers within the state of Kentucky and are not subject to sanctions for non-compliance.  As a result, they can make claims which attorneys are barred from making and can employ various SEO to make their site more visible. DUI.com and the other websites most often have no basis to recommend any particular attorney other than payment of fees.  They don't care if you have 20 years of experience handling DUI cases or if you've never handled a single case.  As with other areas of business, it is difficult to tell if a web based business has hundreds of employees and customers, or if they just started last week in someone's basement. As an attorney who has practiced DUI and criminal law for nearly 20 years in Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati, I'm confident in advising clients of their rights and of defending them in criminal courts.  If you have been arrested for DUI or any other traffic or criminal charge, contact Michael W. Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 581-MIKE, 859-581-6453

How Can I Do a Cheap Divorce?

Some divorces are costly and others are not. The major factor is the number of areas in which the parties disagree. Since the large majority of divorce attorneys charge hourly rates, the more the parties disagree the more time involved for the attorneys. Every year I inherit a number of cases where the parties utilized a "cheap" service such as legalzoom, rocketlawyer, or others.  Since Kentucky does not have forms for divorces, these do it yourself divorces are often insufficient to be accepted by the local courts in Northern Kentucky.  The parties end up paying over $1,000 in legal fees in addition to the $595 they paid through the do it yourself website. The easiest way to an dissolution is to sit down with your spouse and attempt to agree on the terms of the divorce: custody, parenting, division of assets and debts.  There may be a few items which cannot be agreed upon, but the majority of items are not that difficult.  If the parties can agree on all terms, often they can utilize one attorney to draft all documents.  This may drastically reduce the total costs for the divorce. If you have questions or concerns in Boone, Campbell or Kenton Counties, call Bouldin Law Firm to schedule a consultation.  859-581-6453 (581-MIKE).

What Is DC?

In Kentucky, the abbreviation of DC is shorthand on criminal citations for Disorderly Conduct.  A defendant may be given a citation or may be arrested on charges of Disorderly Conduct.  Most often, DC is charged after an individual, often intoxicated, has failed or refuses to abide by a police officer's order. Disorderly conduct is usually charged as a class A misdemeanor in Kentucky.  As a class A misdemeanor, it is punishable by up to 12 months in jail, $500 fine or both in addition to any restitution and court costs.  It is defined in KRS 525.055.  There is another provision under KRS 525.060 for DC to be charged as a class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail. Restitution may be if the Disorderly Conduct resulted in damage to property.  For example,  if the defendant was involved in a fight, medical bills or damaged property would be subject to restitution.  Court costs vary by county but generally range from $140-$200. If you have been charged with Disorderly Conduct or any other misdemeanor or felony in Northern Kentucky, contact Michael Bouldin at mike@bouldinlawfirm.com or call 581-MIKE, 859-581-6453 for a consultation and estimate of fees.  

What Are Father's Rights?

As a divorce and custody attorney for nearly 20 years I am often asked about "Father's Rights."  The short answer is that a father has the same rights as any other parent.  In a divorce, this is automatic. If the parties are not married, the father's rights cannot be enforced until after paternity has been established.  Kentucky law is clear that neither parent has preferential rights.* (Ohio note) As often as father's ask about their rights do mother's assume that their rights are superior.  Nowhere in Kentucky statutes is either parent granted preferential rights for any reason.  The BEST INTEREST OF THE CHILDREN is paramount in any custody case heard by family courts in Kentucky. Many clients also question what will happen if one party abandons the marital residence.  This is specifically addressed in KRS 403.270 (4) The abandonment of the family residence by a custodial party shall not be considered where said party was physically harmed or was seriously threatened with physical harm by his or her spouse, when such harm or threat of harm was causally related to the abandonment. If you have custody questions regarding father's rights, mother's rights whether in a divorce, post divorce or by unwed parents, contact a family law attorney in your area.  For Campbell, Kenton, Boone and Hamilton Counties, call Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) for a consultation. *This is not the same in Ohio.  Unwed mothers have clearly superior rights to fathers under Ohio law.

What Is Penalty for Disorderly Conduct?

Disorderly conduct, often referred to as DC in a complaint or citation, is usually charged as a class A misdemeanor in Kentucky.  As a class A misdemeanor, it is punishable by up to 12 months in jail, $500 fine or both in addition to any restitution and court costs.  It is defined in KRS 525.055.  There is another provision under KRS 525.060 for DC to be charged as a class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail. Restitution may be if the Disorderly Conduct resulted in damage to property.  For example,  if the defendant was involved in a fight, medical bills or damaged property would be subject to restitution.  Court costs vary by county but generally range from $140-$200. If you have been charged with DC or any other misdemeanor or felony in Northern Kentucky, contact Michael Bouldin at mike@bouldinlawfirm.com or call 581-MIKE, 859-581-6453 for a consultation and estimate of fees.  Often a competent attorney can be retained for less than you may think.

What Is Penalty for Forgery?

Forgery can b e charged as a Class C or D felony in Kentucky or as a Class A misdemeanor. It is often used as a charge where a stolen check is cashed. Possession of a forged instrument for stolen check is a D felony and is easier to prove since you just have to possess the forged instrument, the prosecution does not have to prove WHO actually did the forgery. Class C felony is punishable by 5-10 years in prison, Class D felony is punishable by 1-5 years in prison and Class A misdemeanor is punishable by up to 12 months in county jail.  The charges are based on what the instrument/document was that was forged.  For example, a forged lease contract is likely a misdemeanor, a check is a D felony and a bond or fake money is a Class C felony.  Of course, with money there are other potential charges as well.  Forgery and Possession of Forged Instrument charges are defined in KRS 516.010 and following.  There are 3 levels of charges for forgery and 3 levels of charges for possession of forged instrument.  These charges may be misdemeanor or felony charges. If you are charged with forgery or possession of a forged instrument you need to hire a criminal defense attorney.  For advice and representation in Cincinnati or Northern Kentucky, contact Michael Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453.

What Does a Forgery Charge Mean?

Forgery is a Class D felony in Kentucky and can carry 1-5 years in prison. It is often used as a charge where a stolen check is cashed. Possession of a forged instrument is also a D felony and is easier to prove since you just have to possess the forged instrument, the prosecution does not have to prove WHO actually did the forgery. Forgery and Possession of Forged Instrument charges are defined in KRS 516.010 and following.  There are 3 levels of charges for forgery and 3 levels of charges for possession of forged instrument.  These charges may be misdemeanor or felony charges. If you are charged with forgery or possession of a forged instrument you need to hire a criminal defense attorney.  For advice and representation in Cincinnati or Northern Kentucky, contact Michael Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or call 859-581-6453.  

What Is Penalty For Assault?

In Kentucky, there are various charges relating to assault.  A4, or Assault in the 4th Degree, is a misdemeanor which is general assault with minor physical injuries.  It is defined in KRS 508.040 and the potential penalties for A4 is up to 12 months in jail and/or $500 fine. Assault can also be charged as a felony if (1) committed upon a police officer, (2) if there are serious physical injuries, or (3) if there is a weapon involved in the assault. Assault 3rd degree is similar to A4, that is minor injuries but when committed against a police officer or other protected persons such as social worker, detention center worker.  A3 is located in KRS 508.030 and is considered a Class D felony and is punishable by 1-5 years in prison. Assault 2nd degree is when there is serious physical injury to the victim or if the assault involves the use of a deadly weapon or dangerous ordinance.  Assault 2nd degree is defined by KRS 508.020 and considered a Class C felony punishable by 5-10 years in prison.  Assault 1st Degree is a class B felony under KRS 508.010 and involves serious physical injury and the use of a deadly weapon.  It is punishable by 10-20 years in prison. If you have been charged with Assault, whether felony or misdemeanor you need to retain legal counsel.  For consultation in Kenton, Boone, Grant, Gallatin, or Campbell counties, or in Cincinnati, call Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE). *Information herein relates to charges in Kentucky.  If you are charged with misdemeanor or felony assault in Ohio, the charges and potential penalties differ from Kentucky.  Call for more information.

What Is Penalty for A4/DV?

In Kentucky, A4 is shorthand for the charge of Assault, 4th Degree and DV is shorthand for Domestic Violence.  It is defined in Kentucky Revised Statutes §508.030 as follows: KRS 508.030 - Assault in the fourth degree. (1) A person is guilty of assault in the fourth degree when: (a) He intentionally or wantonly causes physical injury to another person; or (b) With recklessness he causes physical injury to another person by means of a deadly weapon or a dangerous instrument. (2) Assault in the fourth degree is a Class A misdemeanor. As a class A misdemeanor, the crime of Assault 4 is punishable by up to 12 months in county jail and/or $500 fine, in addition to court costs.  The defendant may also be made to pay restitution if there are any out of pocket expenses or medical bills of the victim.  Assault 4th may or may not be against a significant other, in which case the DV actually makes sense.  Warning: there may be 2 separate cases, the criminal charge of A4 in addition to the EPO/DVO case in a separate court. If you are charged with A4/DV, you need to hire an attorney.  In Northern Kentucky, contact Bouldin Law Firm at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) for a consultation.  

What Is A4/DV in Kentucky?

A4/DV is shorthand for the charge of Assault, 4th Degree and DV is shorthand for Domestic Violence.  It is defined in Kentucky Revised Statutes §508.030 as follows: KRS 508.030 - Assault in the fourth degree. (1) A person is guilty of assault in the fourth degree when: (a) He intentionally or wantonly causes physical injury to another person; or (b) With recklessness he causes physical injury to another person by means of a deadly weapon or a dangerous instrument. (2) Assault in the fourth degree is a Class A misdemeanor. As a class A misdemeanor, the crime of Assault 4 is punishable by up to 12 months in county jail and/or $500 fine, in addition to court costs.  The defendant may also be made to pay restitution if there are any out of pocket expenses or medical bills of the victim.  Assault 4th may or may not be against a significant other, in which case the DV actually makes sense. If you are charged with A4/DV, you need to hire an attorney.  In Northern Kentucky, contact Bouldin Law Firm at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) for a consultation.  

What is NKYDivorce.com?

The website of nkydivorce.com is run by the Academy of Northern Kentucky Collaborative Law Professionals, Inc. of which I am an attorney-member. This site is not intended to confuse, but to offer information regarding divorce, dissolution as well as the collaborative law and collaborative divorce process. Collaborative divorce is a subset of divorce/dissolution law.  In collaborative law the parties agree to resolve their dissolution and the terms are agreed to between the parties without involving the courts or judges.  Parties are contractually bound by their agreements, which includes complete and honest disclosure of financial information, including assets and debts. The collaborative law website is devoted to promotion of the collaborative law process. While I personally am a big proponent of this process, my blog website herein, www.nky-divorce.com, is broader in scope and discusses all aspects of divorce, including custody, child support, divorce, domestic violence, as well as contested and uncontested divorce or dissolution and the collaborative process. If you would like to learn more about divorce, dissolution or the collaborative process, call Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) or email at mike@bouldinlawfirm.com. 

What Is Penalty for DUI in Kentucky?

The penalties for DUI charge in Kentucky vary based on the number of prior offenses.  If you have a second or subsequent offense, there are long suspensions and mandatory jail times and you need an attorney. If you are charged with a first offense DUI, the potential penalties range from 0-30 days of jail, $200-500 fine, court costs, DUI service fee, and loss of license for up to 120 days.  If found guilty of an aggravating circumstance, there is a 4 day jail which is mandatory.  Also, if you refuse the breathalyzer, you can lose your license for up to the 120 days regardless of whether you are acquitted for the underlying DUI. If you have been charged with DUI in Gallatin, Boone, Campbell or Kenton County, call my office for a consultation and representation.  You can reach the Bouldin Law Firm and Michael Bouldin at mwbouldin2@gmail.com or cal 859-581-6453 to schedule an appointment.  Simple questions and fees ARE generally discussed over the phone. If you are charged in Hamilton County or elsewhere in Ohio, the fines, penalties and suspension are very different.  There is mandatory jail time (sometimes with DIP alternative) and longer suspension for first offense.  I also practice DUI law in Cincinnati and Batavia, Hamilton and Clermont Counties.

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